Last edited by Tokus
Friday, October 9, 2020 | History

2 edition of alienation of temporal goods in clerical religious institutes found in the catalog.

alienation of temporal goods in clerical religious institutes

Douglas P. Stamp

alienation of temporal goods in clerical religious institutes

by Douglas P. Stamp

  • 24 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Church property (Canon law),
  • Monasticism and religious orders (Canon law),
  • Administrative law (Canon law)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Douglas P. Stamp.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 247 leaves.
    Number of Pages247
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18094204M
    ISBN 100315825170

      – the third concerns the very life of religious institutes, and especially their future, which depends in part upon the permanent formation of their members. ITS CONTENT. Continued formation is a global process of renewal which extends to all aspects of the religious person and to the whole institute itself. Code of Canon Law BOOK V. THE TEMPORAL GOODS OF THE CHURCH. LIBER V. DE BONIS ECCLESIAE TEMPORALIBUS. 1. To pursue its proper purposes, the Catholic Church by innate right is able to acquire, retain, administer, and alienate temporal goods independently from civil power. 2.

    Basic concepts and principles -- ch. 2. Associations without juridic status -- ch. 3. Eastern churches and temporal goods -- ch. 4. The temporal goods of religious institutes -- ch. 5. Renumeration for church employees -- ch. 6. Support for the church -- ch. 7. Taxation, assessments and extraordinary collections -- ch. 8. Solicitation of funds. ß2 In clerical religious institutes of pontifical right, Superiors have in addition the ecclesiastical power of governance, for both the external and the internal forum. Can. ß1 Since the temporal goods of religious institutes are ecclesiastical goods, they are governed by the provisions of Book V on 'The Temporal Goods of the Church.

    ALIENATION (of property): The transfer of ownership of temporal goods to someone else. Property owned by public juridic persons in the Church is ecclesiastical property, and can be alienated only with the necessary authorization in order to protect the patrimony of the institute. RELIGIOUS, CANON LAW OF. Religious Institutes are one of the two forms of consecrated life delineated in the Code of Canon Law (cc. – ). The code first treats both religious institutes and secular institutes (cc. – ), then each separately (religious institutes in cc. – and secular institutes in cc. – ). Canon describes life consecrated through the.


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Alienation of temporal goods in clerical religious institutes by Douglas P. Stamp Download PDF EPUB FB2

Alienation of temporal goods - cc. §§, pious will, trusts – cc. ; 5. What is the purpose of temporal goods. The fourfold purpose of temporal goods is listed in canon §2: for divine worship, for the support of clergy and other ministers, for the apostolate and for works of charity, especially toward the poor and needy.

The Administration of Temporal Goods in Religious Institutes () (CUA Studies in Canon Law) Hardcover – Ma by Raymond Edward Mcmanus (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ Author: Raymond Edward Mcmanus.

BOOK V. THE TEMPORAL GOODS OF THE CHURCH LIBER V. DE BONIS ECCLESIAE TEMPORALIBUS Can. To pursue its proper purposes, the Catholic Church by innate right is able to acquire, retain, administer, and alienate temporal goods independently from civil power.

This paper will look at regulations for alienation of temporal goods of suppressed religious institutes, and at how provision for goods can be improved in future.

Chapter One will focus on canons and of the Code of Canon Law (CIC),2 with attention to parallels. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied.

Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. The administration of temporal goods in religious institutes. Book 5 The Temporal Goods Of The Church Can.

§1 The catholic Church has the inherent right, independently of any secular power, to acquire, retain, administer and alienate temporal goods, in pursuit of its proper objectives. Canon §1 To alienate goods whose value exceeds the determined minimum sum, it is also required that there be: 1° a just reason, such as urgent necessity, evident advantage, or a religious, charitable or other grave pastoral reason; 2° a written expert valuation of the goods to be alienated.

§2 To avoid harm to the Church, any other precautions drawn up by lawful authority are. The Resource Center for Religious Institutes (RCRI) is an organization created to serve the needs of Catholic communities of religious women and men. Our professional staff offers advice and provides resources for the leadership of religious institutes who become members of RCRI.

temporal goods which the Church needs to fulfill her purpose so that all, clerical, male or female, whose primary task is the day-to-day sharing the word "alienation" and the meaning of the word "stable patrimony" for the simple reason that implied in the canon law is a different system of governance and management and possession than.

61 CCEO §1: ‘The alienation of ecclesiastical goods, which constitute by legitimate designation the stable patrimony of a juridic person, requires the following: 1° a just cause, such as urgent necessity, evident advantage, piety, charity, or a pastoral reason; 2° a written appraisal by experts of the asset to be alienated; 3° in cases prescribed by law, written consent of the competent authority, without which the alienation.

Nevertheless, they are to avoid any appearance of excess, immoderate wealth, and accumulation of goods. Can. Since the temporal goods of religious institutes are ecclesiastical, they are governed by the prescripts of Book V, The Temporal Goods of the Church, unless other provision is expressly made.

- Since patrimony includes more than temporal goods, the name was given as ‘Temporal Goods’. C Right to Property- Right of the Church to acquire, retain, administer & alienate goods independent of civil authority.- Catholic Church is a moral person by.

Can. §1 Since they are by virtue of the law juridical persons, institutes, provinces and houses have the capacity to acquire, possess, administer and alienate temporal goods, unless this capacity is excluded or limited in the constitutions.

§2 They are, however, to avoid all appearance of luxury, excessive gain and the accumulation of goods. Church on this matter. In the section on religious institutes in Book II of the new Code there are seven canons which deal specifically with 'Temporal goods and their administration' (cc.

More- over, since temporal goods of religious institutes are 'ecclesiastical. contained in Book V of the Code of Canon Law.1 Book V of the code, pertaining to temporal goods, states in a religious institutes, although the alienation requirements of Canons to apply as well, to the extent that they are not preempted by Canonsection 3.

In the alienation of the temporal goods of the Major Archiepiscopal Church the common and particular laws of the Church must be followed (cf. –Particular Law of Permanent Synod Act9. The Code of Canon Law distinguishes four major types of acts when dealing with temporal goods: acquisition, possession, administration and alienation.

Administration is an act that recurs on an almost daily basis. In a religious institute, it is the competent superior. In church-sponsored health care and educational institutions, the chief. ABSTRACT The promulgation of the CCEO and the elevation of the Syro-Malabar Church sui iuris to the status of a major archiepiscopal Church, on 16 Decemberare important milestones in the recent history of the Church.

The new status of the Syro-Malabar Church necessitated a revised system of administration of its temporal goods. title ii: religious institutes book v: the temporal goods of the church. title i: the acquisition of goods contracts and especially alienation.

title iv: pious dispositions in general and pious foundations. book vi: sanctions in the church. When religious institutes deal with the sale of property or the contracting of debts, one question that usually arises is whether this transaction is subject to the canonical rules governing alienation.

It should be noted the rules apply only to what is known as stable patrimony. The patrimony or temporal goods of a public juridic person in."Temporal Administration of the Religious House in a Non exempt Clerical Pontifical Institute" (P) Cox, Ronald J. "A Study of the Juridic Status of Laymen in the Writing of the Medieval Canonists" (P) Clancy, Walter B.The alienation of temporal goods in clerical religious institutes THOMAS, Paul Exclaustration in the Code of canon law CONNELL, James Invalidation and incapacitating laws in the Code of canon law D’SOUZA, Victor.